Tag Archives: novel

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

I have tried to start this blog post 3 times already, and so far nothing has worked. So this will have to do.

A considerable amount of time has certainly passed between the last post and this but, like the father who went out for groceries 9 years ago and only returned today, let us all just carry on as if nothing has happened.

Honey, I’m home.

Today I shall attempt a short review of the latest Robert Galbraith novel, Career of Evil.

Career of Evil is the third instalment in Robert Galbraith’s  series, centering around private detective Cormoran (it’s kind of like Cameron, but isn’t) Strike and his extremely loveable (seriously) side-kick Robin Ellacott.

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I’ve never seen a book pose so hard in my entire life.

Without giving anything away, the story begins when a package by an unknown courier is delivered to my beloved Robin. Attached is a note containing lyrics by the band Blue Öyster Cult, which on its own could actually be a nice gesture, if it wasn’t sullied by a woman’s severed leg.

Strike (yes, we are on second name basis) is subsequently convinced that the perpetrator is one of four people, all of whom are from his past and with some reason to hate his guts.

What I loved about this book, which differed from the previous two, was that the narrative was split roughly 50/50 between both Robin and Strike. As we are taken through the case trying to whittle down the list of suspects, we are also taken back in time and given a large insight into the pasts of both protagonists. It feels as if the first two books introduced the characters whereas this third part has truly opened them up to us.

As an added feature, we are also shown parts of the story from the point of view of the killer. As gruesome as these sections were, I thought they were a brilliant touch to a great book.

Despite the fact that ‘The Cuckoo’s Calling’ and ‘The Silkworm’ set the bar very high in my mind, ‘Career of Evil’ not only met my expectations, but pretty much raised them even further for the next book. Good luck JK- I mean Robert.

If I was to criticise the book at all I would say that perhaps there could have been more twists added to the story, but then I would instantly retort by stating that the lack of a ‘twist at every turn’ added a realness to the novel.

At least I tried.

I am still struggling to decide whether this book or the first was my favourite in the series so far. If I were to go purely with my gut, the gut being the most literary-appreciative organ in the body after all, I would have to say that The Cuckoo’s Calling just about edges it. Nevertheless, Career of Evil is still a definite page turner.

It will make you miss your stop on the bus or the tube. It will make you laugh out loud at parts and may even break your heart at others. Simply put, It’s like an Adele song on steroids.

If you haven’t read the series yet then you should start questioning your life choices and maybe place me in charge of them.

Overall rating: 9/10.

Lastly, as the series will be undergoing a TV adaptation, I would like to formally nominate Greg Davies for the part of Cormoran Strike. Watch this space.

Thank you for spending your not-so-valuable time reading my blog post. Feel free to use the comment section to your fingers content. Discuss the book, discuss me, discuss global warming, discuss the sheriff but do not, I repeat DO NOT, discuss the deputy.

Happy New Year and good morrow.

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The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

The Book I shall attempt to share my thoughts on today is ‘The Rosie Project’; a novel by Australian author Graeme Simsion originally published in the glorious year of 2013 (as you can tell, I like to keep my blog VERY current).

Please note, coffee table not included

Please note, coffee table not included

For the first 50 (ish) pages I reeeeaally didn’t like this book. I must admit that my negative opinions may be based on the fact that it’s protagonist, Genetics Professor Don Tillman, reminded me too much of Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory.

I hate the Big Bang Theory.

Well ok, ‘hate’ is a strong word but, let’s put it this way, if I flicked onto E4 and BBT was on…. I’d change the channel. That’s how serious I am about this. I don’t mess around. Come at me.

I even considered giving up and reading something else but the term ‘giving up’ isn’t a phrase that is in my vocabulary. Actually it is, but I see no reason to share that here as that’s a whole other blog post waiting to happen (The truth is that I did actually start writing that post but, needless to say..). Nevertheless, giving in and heeding the advice of my inner-farmer/conscience, I ploughed on.  And what did I find? My opinions began to evolve.

The basic synopsis of the book is that of a socially inept but brilliant-minded Genetics professor by the name of Don Tillman, seemingly with Asperger’s syndrome, and his experiment to locate the ideal wife. This said experiment eventually leads him to Rosie, who he labels ‘the world’s most incompatible woman.’ Charming.

Personally I felt that the plot was somewhat predictable but, just in case you weren’t already aware, I am a sucker for a clichéd love story. I began to warm towards Don and, not only like him, but I also came to root for him in his quest to find his perfect woman. I joined him on his journey, feeling happy for him at his high points as well as short pangs of sadness whenever the author dictated I should.

So all-in-all, I am not sure what to make of the book at all. I’m not sure if I didn’t like it simply because of my predetermined dislike (‘hate’ was a strong word after all) of The Big Bang Theory OR if I only ended up liking it due to my predilection of clichéd love stories. My gut is ordering me to give it a rating of 3 Stars, but is that because I’m just a nice guy, or because I had too much to drink at breakfast??? Pondering my own opinion on the matter has me reconsidering the very essence and purpose of my being.

I hate this book for confusing me, but I shall lend an ear to my gut, become grossly disfigured in the process, and give The Rosie Project 3 Stars (rounded up from 2.75) out of a possible 5. After all it was an easy-to-read novel, not completely lacking in funny moments, and it was my paperback companion during the tumultuous times of the London Tube strike last week.

So if you’ve read the book; do not be shy, feel free to use the comments section and share your opinions with the World! And if you’re looking for a book to read this summer that was originally published two summer’s ago, The Rosie Project may be just what you were looking for.

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